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December 2017 Unrefined Salt

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December 2017

I would like to take a minute to wish everyone a wonderful Christmas and a very happy and HEALTHY

New Year!!  We are so very grateful for your continued support.  Merry Christmas from Maurine, Rosa, Cathy, Elisabeth, Nancy, and Chantelle

We will be having our annual book giveaway through the month of December.  Whatever books remain will be donated.

The Bridge Card/Double Up Buck program will run through December 30 at the Monroe Farmers Market.

Chantelle will be coordinating the program at the market.  She is selling healing and homemade tea, heirloom vegetables, and sourdough breads on Saturdays from 7am-12noon.

www.farmersmarketmonroemi.com

Gift Certificates for health consultations, Ionic foot baths, or store items make a great Christmas gift this year.

Natural Health Consultations with Maurine-½ hour $30.00; 1 hour $50.00

  Call 734-240-2786 to make appointment

Ionic Foot Bath now available by appointment-1/2 hour $35.00; 1 hour $50.00 Now get 5 foot baths and get the next one free.

Family Farms Co-op: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Orders due via email December 13 by noon; Pickup December 15 from 2:30-3:30-at VFW Hall 1620 Dix-Toledo, Southgate

 First Friday Downtown Monroe December 1 Bonus Discount Day 5% off for First Friday

Join many businesses with art exhibits, food and drink specials.

Transitions for Women a support group for women that have lost their partners-Next Meeting December 16

Meeting at Suzanne’s at 3PM

Downtown Light Parade December 16

Yoga with Shannon: Saturday sessions Christ Lutheran Church 8:15-9:15 AM

Yoga with Chantelle-Monday, and Wednesday- Calendar available at the Store

CLASSES:  New classes and DVD discussions will be scheduled through the store beginning in January.  Class list: Homeopathy, Diabetes, Vitamins & Herbs, Women’s Hormone Health, Cancer Prevention, Salve Making, and Food Fermentation.  To be added to our class list feel free to fill out a form at the store or e-mail at www.monroehealthmatters.com

Healthy Happenings: Unrefined Salt -Salt from Salt Your Way to Health byDavid Brownstein, M.D.

For many years our medical professionals have preached a low sodium diet to treat high blood pressure and other heart related illnesses.  As a nurse for over 40 years I believed it too.  However, after seeing the problems with low sodium diets, lower energy levels, hormonal and immune imbalances, I began to change my mind. To make matters worse, a 1995 study from M. Alderman shows that low urinary sodium is associated with greater risk of myocardial infarction among treated hypertensive men.   So what are we to do?  Dr. Brownstein recommends switching from refined (table salt) to unrefined (Celtic) salt.  Both of my parents and some of my siblings have been diagnosed with heart disease so I wanted to choose a different path.  I have been using Celtic sea salt as a supplement (consuming in water ¼ to ½ teaspoons) daily for several years.  I am happy to report my blood pressure is normal (even with the new guidelines reducing stage 1 hypertension from 140/90 to 130/80).  I believe it is important to monitor you B/P closely and if you have a problem begin to follow a heart healthy lifestyle.  Dr. Brownstein believes unrefined sea salt can be a part of a heart healthy program.

 

·         What is the difference between refined and unrefined salt?

1.      Refined salt is mainly harvested from salt mines as brine. A highly concentrated solution of salt and water, the brine is often treated with chemicals to remove minerals (which are sold for use in industry).    The solution is evaporated under high compression and heat which disrupts the molecular structure of salt.  Refined salt contains sodium (39%) and chloride (60 %) and only .01% of iodide.  Some of the refined salt also contains anti-caking agents.  Dextrose, also known as refined sugar, is used as a stabilizer so that iodide will stay in the salt.  

2.      Unrefined salt contains much more than sodium and chloride.  Unrefined salt contains all of the elements necessary for life.  Celtic Sea Salt (Light Grey) contains 33% sodium, 50.9 % chloride, 1.8 % minerals and trace elements (over 80 trace mineral) and 14.3 % moisture.  Unrefined salt does not contain appreciable amounts of iodide.  (For table use I add kelp for its iodine content).

Celtic salt is harvested near the coast of northwestern France.  The wind and sun evaporates the ocean water, leaving mineral rich brine. 

Problems with Low

·         Salt Diets:

1.      Low-Salt Diets and Heart Attacks- the study by Alderman studied nearly 3,000 hypertensive subjects and the results showed there was a 430% increase in heart attacks in the group with the lowest salt intake compared the group with the highest salt intake.  Why?  Low-sodium diet has been shown to cause multiple nutrient deficiencies, including depletion of calcium and magnesium, as well as depletion of potassium and B-vitamins.

2.      Low-Salt Diets and Cholesterol- Dr. Brownstein have found in his practice that unrefined salt, as part of a holistic program, has the ability to lower both cholesterol and LDL cholesterol.

3.      Hormones are Influenced by Low Salt Diets- Low-salt diets will result in increasing certain hormones (i.e. aldosterone, rennin, angiotensin and noradrenalin) to help the kidneys retain more sodium. 

The hormone, insulin, has also been shown to increase in a low-salt diet).  Elevated insulin levels have been associated with numerous metabolic disorders including diabetes, polycystic ovaries (PCOS), and obesity. 

Low-Salt Diets Promote Toxicity- A low-salt diet can lead to the accumulation of toxic elements in the body.  The toxicity of bromide is exacerbated in a low salt environment.  Bromide is a toxic element that is associated with delirium, psychomotor retardation, schizophrenia, and hallucinations.  Potassium Bromate in flour is converted to bromide when bread is baked at high temperatures.   Salt is a necessary ingredient in the diet that allows the body to detoxify toxic substances such as bromine.

·         Hypertension and Salt:  Dr. Brownstein found in his medical practice that the majority of his hypertensive patients did not benefit from following the standard medical practice for low sodium diets.  He found out that the few studies on low sodium diets were only focusing on refined salt not unrefined salt that includes many valuable vitamins and minerals such as magnesium and potassium, which are vital to maintaining normal blood pressure.

v  My experience with Celtic (unrefined) sea salt has been very positive.  My blood pressure was always low, after adding ¼-1/2 sea salt daily in my morning tonic, the blood pressure normalized.  What is so amazing about unrefined salt is its ability to normalize blood pressure. 

v  Dr. Brownstein recommends eliminating refined salt, including most packaged foods.  In his experience he reports the use of unrefined sea salt has not resulted in elevated blood pressure for his patients.

v  Dr. Brownstein recommends using ¼ teaspoon of unrefined salt for every quart of water ingested.  The addition of unrefined salt to food or cooking will not adversely affect blood pressure or other health parameters in patients with normal kidney function.  However, people with kidney problems, must consult your physician for appropriate salt intake.

·         Uses of Unrefined Salt:

v  Adrenal Exhaustion

v  Allergic Rhinitis (runny nose): Mix ¼ teaspoon unrefined salt with ¼ teaspoon baking soda in 8 ounces of filtered water. I have been using this formula in a nasal sprayer twice a day for several years.

v  Asthma: At the onset of wheezing, place a large pinch of unrefined on your tongue and drink 8 oz. filtered water at room temperature.  Repeat in 15-30 minutes.  If that does not work, use ¼ teaspoon of unrefined salt in 6 oz. filtered water.  Dr. Brownstein has used this to help with his asthma several times.

v  Detoxification: Adding 2 cups of unrefined salt and 2 cups of baking soda to the bath water can help stimulate the lymph system.

v  Exercise: When you begin to exercise, take one large pinch of unrefined salt with a glass of water.  Salt will prevent muscle cramps and aid in muscle recovery after exercise. Or you can make a Homemade Electrolyte Drink-

Blend together ½ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice, 1/3 cup pure maple syrup, ½ teaspoon Celtic sea salt and 1 quart of filtered water in a glass container.

v  Gastritis: Taking a large pinch of unrefined salt with meals helps to prevent reflux.   Salt is an alkalinizing agent and helps to buffer excess acidity in the stomach.

v  Insomnia:  One large pinch of salt with a small amount of warm water can facilitate a good night’s sleep.

v  Poison Ivy:  Soak affected area in hot salt water (1/4 teaspoon per quart of water)

v  Preservative:  Salt has been used for thousands of years to help reserve food.  Traditional cultures use salt to make fermented vegetables and sauerkraut.

Maurine is happy to provide her opinion on diet and nutrition, supplements and lifestyle choices. This information is for educational purposes only. It is not meant to replace the advice of your physician and is not to be considered medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Should you have any concerns please contact your physician directly.

As always, contact your pharmacist regarding any potential vitamin/drug interactions.  Notify physician regarding any alternative remedies.

I was sorry to learn that in November Door to Door organics closed. I will dearly miss this service.

Raw cow & goat milk and Amish grass fed meat e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 1-269-476-8883

Store News: Local Delivery to shut-ins available

v  Bridge Cards accepted at the store.

v  Family Discount Day: Every Wednesday get 5% off of entire order.

v  Free Muscle Testing

v  Ionic Food Bath available by appointment only; 1/2 hour $35.00; 1 hour $50.00

Save the Earth Tip: Little Wonders LEDs (light-emitting diodes) are small, solid extremely energy efficient lightbulbs.  Until recently, they were available only in single-bulb applications, often on electronic gadgets, but they’re now available in a variety of guises.  They last ten times as long as compact fluorescents, and a massive 130 times longer than a typical incandescent bulbs, and use a fraction of the wattage.   

Words to Live By:He who has health, has hope; and he who has hope, has everything     Arabian Proverb

Recipe of the Month

Breakfast Porridge adapted from Nourishing Traditions; this fermented food is full of probiotics.

1 cup barley, oats, teff, or farro grain                                                                                1 cup filtered water

1 cup warm filtered water plus 2 tablespoons whey, plain yogurt, kefir, or buttermilk                     1 tablespoon ground flax

½ teaspoon Celtic Sea Salt                                                                             Pure maple syrup, stevia or honey to taste

 

For the highest benefit and best absorption, porridge should be soaked overnight.  Once soaked the oatmeal and barley cooks in 5 minutes; teff and farro cooks in 10 minutes.

 

For those with severe milk allergy, use lemon juice or vinegar in place of the yogurt                           

 

Bring 1 cup of filtered water to boil with the Celtic sea salt.  Add the soaked flakes or grains, reduce heat, cover and simmer for several minutes.  Remove from heat, stir in ground flax and let stand for a few minutes.  I add crispy nuts and fresh or frozen fruit.  Enjoy!

 

Maurine Sharp Natural Nurse

Health Matters Herbs and More 17 E. Second St. Monroe, Michigan 48161

734-240-2786 http://www.monroehealthmatters.com/

Store Hours: Monday –Friday 10:00-5:30; Saturday 10:00-2:00 e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

December 2017 Unrefined Salt  

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